Anti-oppressive Practice Definition

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Anti-oppressive Practice Definition



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What is ANTI-OPPRESSIVE PRACTICE? What does ANTI-OPPRESSIVE PRACTICE mean?

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Pease, and L. Briskman, eds. Critical social work: An introduction to theories and practices. This Australian text envisions the profession as one that challenges oppression and privilege, and deeply integrates the political and macro dimensions of the micro experience into all arenas of practice. The fields covered in this text include working with immigrants and refugees, postcolonial work with indigenous Australians, feminist services, family practices, mental health with women, and grief work.

Baines, D. Doing anti-oppressive practice: Social justice social work. Halifax, NS: Fernwood. This text articulates AOP across multiple sites of practice, including at the microlevel and among mandated clients refuting the perspective that AOP has no role with involuntary clients. Bishop, A. Becoming an ally: Breaking the cycle of oppression. London: Zed Books. Carniol, B. Case critical: Social services and social justice in Canada.

Toronto: Between the Lines. Frequently an introductory text for Canadian students. Carniol details the moral imperative for social justice, implicating the power holders in relations of domination, and astutely linking these to the lives of social work clients. The text is ripe with current research, exploration of various axes of oppression, and the history and current debates in social work practice. Dominelli, L. Anti-oppressive social work theory and practice. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. Dominelli is roundly recognized as the leading scholar in AOP. Her text continues to be an excellent basis for teaching at an introductory level on this topic. Fook, J. Social work: Critical theory and practice.

London: SAGE. Interspersed with critical reflection questions and abundant case examples, this text tends to structural, post-structural, and postmodern dimensions of oppression. Fook uses her own work to enliven critical reflection in the moments of engaging with the text, and thus models the critical reflexivity. Although written a decade ago, it retains a cutting edge for its focus on epistemologies and postmodern emphases on voice, authorship, and power.

Morgaine, K. Anti-oppressive social work practice: Putting theory into action. Chapters identify core practices that AOP brings into different client populations: individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, policy, social movements and global practices. Its forte is in providing the integration that authored texts provide, alongside comprehensive insights in how AOP informs each dimension of social work practice.

A short set of narratives from practitioners accompany each chapter. Mullaly, B. Challenging oppression: A critical social work approach. Don Mills, ON: Oxford. Mullaly brings thoughtful clarity to understanding dynamics of oppression. His text covers theory and practices at both the interpersonal and structural levels following a similarly useful model as that his text The New Structural Social Work integrates , and expands to include the impact on oppressed bodies with an expansive chapter on internalized oppression and privilege. Shera, W.

Emerging perspectives on anti-oppressive practice. Toronto: Canadian Scholars. Twenty-eight contributions are detailed in this Canadian collection, illustrating the reach of AOP within the profession. The text reaches into theory, fields of practice including child welfare, child care, street youth services, workplace accommodations for those with disabilities, mental health, and gerontology , and deeply into social work education. Issue-based chapters focus on identity, therapeutic discourses, empathy, cultural competence, technology, and community and global themes. Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content on this page. Please subscribe or login. Oxford Bibliographies Online is available by subscription and perpetual access to institutions.

For more information or to contact an Oxford Sales Representative click here. Not a member? Sign up for My OBO. Already a member? Publications Pages Publications Pages. Subscriber sign in You could not be signed in, please check and try again. Community development focuses on systemic issues that create social problems. It involves working to achieve social justice through structur Social service work practice is the foundation for meeting human needs in our society. Students apply core values, ethics and helping skills Understanding family systems is essential to providing optimum support to families.

Students are grounded in family systems theory and explo Assessment and intervention are core skills for qualified social service workers and are fundamental learning requirements for practice in t This course is designed to provide the student with a better understanding of the challenging aspects of growing older. Various topics relat Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in S This program prepares you for your career by providing you with the opportunity to apply for professional accreditation in the field of social services. Get an idea of how much each semester will cost with our Tuition and Fee Estimator.

Tuition and related ancillary fees for this program can be viewed by using the Tuition and Fees Estimator tool at www. Textbooks are available through the campus bookstore. Additional expenses related to verification for field placement requirements. ParaMed clearance police records check and health immunizations are the responsibility of the student. Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

Health Requirements: The physical and emotional health of each applicant to the program must be such that he or she can successfully cope with the program of instruction including the demands of field placement e. Individuals who have concerns about their ability to meet these requirements should contact the coordinator of the program prior to submitting an application. Upon the age of majority being reached this will be required. Students accepted into the Social Service Worker program must meet the following health requirements:. Police Records Check: Though not an admission requirement, applicants must note important information listed below regarding Police Record Check program requirements.

Successful completion of field placement is a requirement for graduation from the Social Service Worker program. Your acceptance for placement is at the discretion of the agency. If you register in the program and do not have a clear PRCSVS and as a result are unable to participate in placement, you will not be able to graduate. Field Placement Eligibility: To be eligible for placement, you must submit proof of a PRCSVS, which will be retained on your departmental file and used only for purposes related to your placement. It is your responsibility to obtain the PRCSVS from your local Police department prior to the deadline identified by your Department and to pay any associated costs.

It may take a long time to obtain this documentation; please submit your application as early as possible. Should you require further information, contact the Program Chair. Students accepted into the Social Service Worker program must meet the following health requirements: Provide evidence of full and complete immunizations. Field placement agencies require the Hepatitis B vaccine and the Influenza vaccine. Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:. Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should notify their Guidance Office prior to their online application at www. Applications for Fall Term and Winter Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration.

Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available. The Social Service Worker program consists of courses that are delivered in a variety of formats including face-to-face in a classroom, hybrid combination of classroom and online learning and online courses. Students participate in all three types of learning. Students also participate in field placement learning activities. Class schedules vary from term to term and courses may be scheduled between the hours of 8 a. Monday through Thursday and 8 a. There is no flexibility in the assigned timetable. There is a significant workload in the program and students need to be prepared to make a full-time commitment to their studies and field placement in order to be successful.

Students may apply for transfer of academic credits from Algonquin College internal transfer or from other institutions external transfer. For more information visit: www. Students pay a fee for each course they wish to be exempt from and, through either a portfolio or challenge examination, a PLAR may lead to the acceptance of work and life experience in lieu of taking certain courses.

Please note we do not PLAR any of our placements. The social service worker field requires mature, flexible workers who commit to personal wellness and self-care as well as the principles of social justice and anti-oppression. This demanding program places students in learning environments and in contact with emotionally challenging situations. This may be unsettling to those who are in current recovery for mental health, abuse or addiction problems. As such, we encourage prospective students to reflect upon their readiness to meet these demands. This full-time day program is also offered on the Pembroke Campus. While the learning outcomes at the Woodroffe and Pembroke Campuses are the same, subject delivery is reflective of the local circumstances which affect program delivery.

There is also an Intensive offering delivered at the Woodroffe Campus. This latter program is for individuals who have completed a degree or diploma from an Ontario College of Applied Arts and Technology in the humanities. Degrees outside of the humanities may be considered on an individual basis. Visit www. For program information, contact the Program Coordinator, Vicky Green at ext. Choosing a program that suits you is the first step to a great career. This quiz might help you decide. This site uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. Find out more on how we use cookies and how you can change your settings. Site Index Maps. Fall Winter Activities in which college staff indirectly or directly supervise students and for which college staff undertake one or more of the following activities: Ensure that assignments given to students and the work being done by students are suitable for the program.

Help address problems encountered by students in the service-learning project activity. Activities in which college staff do not directly supervise students and for which college staff undertake one or more of the following activities: Make periodic site visits. Ensure that assignments given to students and the work being done by students are suitable for the program. Help address problems encountered by students in the field or work placement activity. Apply Now. International Students Apply Here. Overview Pursue a fulfilling career working on the front line of social services. Through theory and practical experiences, the program prepares you to support a wide range of client groups and communities who are in the process of change or growth, including those impacted by issues such as: loss and separation family crisis poverty violence homelessness addiction disability unemployment oppression resettlement issues As a student, you complete three semesters in field placement experiences totaling almost hours.

Graduates may secure employment as Social Service Workers in provincial, municipal and private social service agencies including: social service departments long-term care facilities addiction and mental health services schools and youth services community health and resource centres shelters residential treatment programs SUCCESS FACTORS This program is well-suited for students who: Have effective interpersonal skills. Are committed to addressing social issues, such as poverty, homelessness, oppression and human rights. Understand the importance of effective communication with clients and community partners. Are team-oriented and enjoy working with others. Deal effectively with stressful situations. Match my Career Interests Career Coach. Level: 01 Code. Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study.

Preparation for Field The ability to understand one's professional roles and responsibilities in the workplace is foundational to success. Social Service Work Interviewing Gathering information through the interview process helps identify the strengths, resources and challenges of individuals, families, groups Addictions Addictions affect people of all walks of life, in virtually all practice areas. Social Welfare in Canada Students study the historical progress of the social welfare system in Canada.

Developmental Psychology I Success in ascertaining the needs of children and parents and our ability to work with them is inexorably intertwined with our knowledge of Level: 02 Code. Communication for Social Service Workers A social service worker creates and maintains a variety of records and documents related to their interactions with colleagues and clients. Group Work Working in groups is part of many social service work settings. Placement I Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies. Legislation and Advocacy Legislation and Advocacy provides invaluable exposure to governance, courts, legislation and advocacy in Canada. Crisis Intervention One's ability to function in a professional manner in crisis situations is essential in the field of social service work.

Placement Seminar I Professional development of social service worker students continues with the extension of the learning opportunities that integrate theory Developmental Psychology II Consideration and application of developmental stages from adolescence to the time of our death is essential when supporting the needs of pe Level: 03 Code. Mental Health Mental health is an increasing concern in Canada today and impacts all areas of social service work. Placement II Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies. Community Development Community development focuses on systemic issues that create social problems.

Applied Social Service Work Practice Social service work practice is the foundation for meeting human needs in our society. Working with Families Understanding family systems is essential to providing optimum support to families. Placement Seminar II Professional development of social service worker students continues with the extension of the learning opportunities that integrate theory Level: 04 Code. Placement III Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies. Assessment, Planning and Practice in Social Service Work Assessment and intervention are core skills for qualified social service workers and are fundamental learning requirements for practice in t Aging in Society This course is designed to provide the student with a better understanding of the challenging aspects of growing older.

Placement Seminar III Professional development of social service worker students continues with the extension of the learning opportunities that integrate theory Choose one from equivalencies: Code. General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in S Sorry - at the moment we can't seem to find a description for that course, try looking on the General Education website. DSN History of Design Visual communications and graphic design have played a key role in the evolution of communication through a number of historical and social art movements.

Graphic design has had a major impact on civilizations over the ages. Students explore graphic design's many influences, including the invention of writing and alphabets, the origins of printing and typography, Victorian, Art Nouveau, Modern Art, and Postmodern design, to the present-day computer revolution and its influence on the many forms of contemporary visual communication that surround us every day. ENLS Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication.

Students practise writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. ENV Environmental Citizenship Environmental citizenship is based on the principles of national citizenship, yet it goes beyond political borders to emphasize global environmental rights and responsibilities.

An environmental citizen is committed to learning more about the environment and to taking responsible environmental action. Through a combination of interactive activities, assignments and discussions, students learn how they are personally connected with current environmental issues. Students are also encouraged to adopt attitudes and behaviours that foster global environmental responsibility. FAM Preparation for Field The ability to understand one's professional roles and responsibilities in the workplace is foundational to success. Students explore their own beliefs and values as they relate to professional relationships and ethical principles in social service work practice.

Students identify current social issues and research social networks that support meeting the diverse needs of the community. FAM Social Service Work Interviewing Gathering information through the interview process helps identify the strengths, resources and challenges of individuals, families, groups and communities to assist them in achieving their goals. As a major component of the field of Social Service Work, students review and recognize the essential elements of a social service work interview, including the skills of active listening, open and closed questioning, awareness of body language and using empathy to build trust. Attention is also paid to relationship building and the facilitation of change while recognizing diversity.

Students practice with role-play scenarios to develop and fine tune these skills in preparation for work with clients. Making use of a simulated exercise, students have the opportunity to practice skills involved in the planning and facilitation of topic based support groups. Emphasis is placed on the co-leadership model, self-awareness and group process skills. FAM Placement I Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies.

Students may practice observation skills, information gathering, interviewing skills, documentation and preliminary assessment skills through supervised practice in an agency setting. FAM Addictions Addictions affect people of all walks of life, in virtually all practice areas. Students gain basic knowledge regarding substance abuse and addiction recovery. Students learn the issues involved in dependency and how to work with clients who are using or misusing substance. Emphasis is placed on the student's capacity to examine their own attitudes towards people who use substances, so that they can help without judgment. FAM Mental Health Mental health is an increasing concern in Canada today and impacts all areas of social service work.

Attitudes, biases and barriers affecting persons with mental illness are examined in relation to the role of social service workers. FAM Placement II Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies. Students are provided the opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge and skills through supervised practice in an agency setting. Students assume increasing levels of responsibility and independence, and continue to increase their writing, reporting, interviewing and engaging and assessment skills as social service professionals.

FAM Legislation and Advocacy Legislation and Advocacy provides invaluable exposure to governance, courts, legislation and advocacy in Canada. Students explore, through research, role plays and discussion, such topics as immigration, human rights, policing, violence, income support, housing, criminal justice, child welfare and legal aid.

FAM Placement III Practical learning experiences support the integration of theory and professional expectations in social service agencies. Students assume increasing levels of responsibility and independence, and refine their writing, reporting, interviewing and engaging and assessment skills as social service professionals. In addition, the fundamentals of inequity, poverty, homelessness, violence, oppression, and discrimination are introduced in both historical and current delivery of service. Students examine their own values and practices to develop their knowledge and to critically analyze current social welfare practices.

FAM Crisis Intervention One's ability to function in a professional manner in crisis situations is essential in the field of social service work. Students differentiate long-term counselling from crisis intervention and examine crisis related assessment techniques and intervention strategies to de-escalate and support those in crisis. Students explore the concept of professional burnout as it relates to crisis. Students practise Non-Violent Crisis Intervention techniques and qualify for an additional certification upon successful completion.

FAM Community Development Community development focuses on systemic issues that create social problems. It involves working to achieve social justice through structural change. Students learn how to improve community awareness, create strategic alliances, foster collaboration and build community.

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